The Breeze – November 30, 1911 – Page 1

The monument erected to the memory of our late Sovereign M. M. Glass will be unveiled under the auspices of this camp, of which he was a member, at Corinth cemetary on the first Sunday in December at 11 o’clock. All near camps are cordially invited to attend and participate in the unveiling service. The cemetary is located about eight miles northwest of Westville and about nine miles from Ponce de Leon.

[Contributed by Michael Strickland]

The Breeze – November 23, 1911 – Pages 1, 2, 4, & 5

GENERAL NEWS

 

 

BIRD HUNTING INJURY (p. 1)
(GARDEN CITY) Wm. Robertson, a boy about fifteen years of age, shot his foot badly last Thursday while out bird hunting. He has lost one of his toes entirely, and the doctor has taken several small bones out of his foot.

DEPOT IMPROVEMENTS (p. 1)
(CALEDONIA) There has been quite an improvement made to the depot at Caledonia.

BOAT TOWS BOAT (p. 1)
(NICEVILLE) The launch “Swan” towed B. H. Morrinson’s launch “Choctawhatchee” to Bolton on Friday. She has been here under repair for some time.

CORINTH CEMETERY (p. 1)
Attention, W. O. W.
The monument erected to the memory of our late Sovereign M. M. Glass will be unveiled under the auspices of this camp, of which he was a member, at Corinth cemetary on the first Sunday in December at 11 o’clock. All near camps are cordially invited to attend and participate in the unveiling service. The cemetery is located about eight miles northwest of Westville and about nine miles from Ponce de Leon.

DEPOT PHONE (p. 2)
It has taken four years for the local telephone company to get permission to install a telephone in the depot here free of charge for the benefit of its patrons, but it was finally obtained and now you can call the depot.

FIRST SUPERINTENDENT OF WALTON SCHOOLS (p. 4)
(LOCALS) The friends of Mr. J. L. McKinnon are urging him to become a candidate for Superintendent of Public Instruction. Mr. McKinnon was the first Superintendent the county ever had, and the old folks say he gave general satisfaction. He will probably announce his candidacy later.

TWO BAPTISMS (p. 4)
(LOCALS) The ordinance of baptism was administered to two candidates at the Baptist church last Sunday night.

WALTON HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS (p. 4)
(LOCALS) There are 21 students from outside Walton county are now attending the High School; so much for the reputatiion of our school and the able corps of instructors from Principal Rogers down to Miss Callie Hentz of the Primary Department.

GROCERY STORE (p. 5)
(LOCALS) Curry Drake and John M. Laird are to open a grocery store in the room formerly occupied by R. J. Jackson in the rear of the Cawthon bank building.

GEORGE DUNSON SHOT (p. 5)
The following account of the killing of Geo. Dunson is from the Andalusia Star.
“John Lingold, Jr., shot G. W. Dunson at the L. & N. station here about 12 o’clock Friday. As a result of the wounds received, Dunson died about 1 o’clock Saturday. The shooting was done with a Colt’s automatic. Four shots were fired by Lingold, two of them striking Dunson.There were a number of eye witnesses to the occurance, and the reports are conflicting as to the details and as to the cause of the trouble. Lingold was immediately taken into custody by Sheriff Livings and held till the result of the wounds could be determined, and on the death of Dunson a formal charge of him on which charge he is now in the county jail. He is a young man about twenty years old and is unmarried. Dunson was a man about fifty years of age and is survived by a large family and numerous relatives. Both parties to the unfortunate occurance were engaged in the livery business here and the affair is greatly deplored.”

YELLOW-LEGGED PULLETS MISSING (p. 5)
They’re telling of a Holmes county farmer who found an auto horn in the road one day and took it home and taught his chickens to recognize its honk as their feed call. One day an automobile passed the farm going about fifteen miles and hour and tooting his horn. The chickens near the house took out after the auto and fourteen hens and three roosters ran themselves to death behind the machine and six of the fattest yellow legged pullets you ever saw are still missing.

 

Contributed by Michael Strickland