Posts Tagged ‘Article excerpts’

The DeFuniak Herald – March 12, 1914 – Article excerpts

Article Excerpts

  • History of the Presbyterian Church of DeFuniak Springs (1)
    • As prepared by the committee appointed for that purpose February 19, 1914
    • Organized November 1883 by Rev. H. M. Anderson in an unpealed pine log shanty 15’x18’ with no door or window shutters, located on Nelson Avenue between 2nd and 3rd Street, furnished only with 1-2 benches, a box and some wooden blocks and rough planks for seating
    • Founding members: W. A. Monroe, Medora Monroe, A. B. McLeod, Dora McLeod, James E. Bowers, Mary Bowers, Nancy Douglass, Jane McLeod, Anna D. Cawthon, D. L. Cambell.  Elders at the time were W. A. Monroe, James E. Bowers, and D. L. Campbell
    • D. C. Cambell was the first Presbyterian to make a permanent residence in DeFuniak Springs in January 1883, and his office served as the first place of worship.  At the time the railroad had just been built and the town consisted of less than a dozen buildings
    • After the shanty, the place of worship moved to the second story of a building that occupies the lot where Burrus Cawthon’s store now stands.  At this location, the church changed from Southern Presbyterian to Northern Presbyterian, a change proposed by Rev. Spralls and supported by Hon. Wallace Bruce.
    • After the Cawthon building, worship was moved to its present location, into the building with brick veneering furnished by Maj. W. J. Vankirk
    • In this final building, the first meeting was held to discuss the founding of Palmer College, under the direction of Rev. F. L. Higdon
    • Church Ministers who have served: Revs. R. Q. Baker, E. E. Ervin, F.L. Higdon, John Stanly Thomas, and Drs. J. W. Walker and Lynn R. Walker
  • Unveiling Last Sunday (1)
    • The monument to the memory of Sovereign Plowden Richardson was unveiled Sunday by the local Woodmen of the World camp, assisted by a number of visiting sovereigns from the various camps of West Florida.
    • About 100 woodmen were in the line to mar to the cemetery where they were joined by a number who had gone out in autos and other forms of conveyance.
    • The ceremony of unveiling and dedicated was gone through nicely at the grave, and afterwards a monument to the memory of Mrs. Helen Burch was unveiled by the local Woodmen’s Circle.
    • Visitors included A. J. Bolton, M. P. Hart, & W.H. Sweeney of Dorcas; W. P. Balkom, W. M. Stanley, J. A. Wooten, M. Gillis, & Joel Balkom of Woodlawn No. 260, Sandy Creek; W. F. Frazier, J. F. Howell, B. G. Bell, Webb Darby, Juniper No. 413, Glendale; D. R. Ward, L. E. Laird, J. B. Caswell, Olive, No. 404, Eucheeanna, W. E. Brown, Bonifay; J. F. Henderson, Beachwood, 438; Tom Cason, Cypress; J. S. Day, Laurel No. 224; John McDonald, Fountain of Youth No. 49; W. G. Wallace, Cherry No. 462, Crestview
  • Unveiling (1)
    • Juniper No. 413 W. O. W. Glendale, FL will on Easter Sunday, April 12 at 10 o’clock in the morning unveil the monument of our departed sovereign J. A. Adkison at Gum Creek Cemetery, near Glendale, FL.
    • Sovereigns will meet at the W. O. W. Hall at Glendale, strictly at 9 o’clock.
    • All Sovereigns who are in good standing with their respective camps are cordially invited to attend
    • Webb Darby, Clerk
  • Overcoat Lost (1)
    • The party that took by mistake a black overcoat with a pair of kid gloves in pocket from Masonic Hall Thursday night will kindly leave the same with W. W> Campbell at Racket Store
  • When Will Republicanism Die? (1)
    • Poem by Pal. A. Northman
    • Republicanism will die when everything in the world is turned upside down (i.e. “When Hades is pleasant and cool”)
  • Some Fish (1)
    • Representative Stephens of Los Angeles was talking in the Capitol one day about the sport of fishing for tuna off the Pacific coast.
    • The Philadelphia Telegraph reported Stephens describing the trips in small mortar boats and fishing with long lines baited with flying fish.  Any fish less than 100 pounds was too small to be good sport.
    • A black messenger had been standing nearby listening, and he asked to clarify if they were really in small mortar boats trying to catch 100 pound fish, and when the representative answered in the affirmative, the messenger asked “But Golly, aint yo’ feared yo’ might ketch one?”
  • Executive Committee (1)
    • The county Democratic executive committee which met here last Friday unanimously re-elected Mr. J. C. McSween as chairman.
    • The various candidates were assessed as follows, Representative, $3.50; tax collector and tax assessor, each $36; county commissioner, $4; treasurer, $18; memer school board, $1; supervisor of registration, $4; justice of peace and constable, $1 each.
  • Wind Jamming (2)
  • A Good Farm (2)
  • Chronicles (2)
  • Local Blurbs (2)
  • Bad on the Boys (2)
  • Church Directory (2)

Compiled by Emily Petroskey

The DeFuniak Herald – March 5, 1914 – Article excerpts

Article Excerpts

  • Chautauqua: Some Attractions of the Past Week (1)
    • Friday and Saturday was cold and stormy and so few crowds arrived on the extension trains
    • The Beulah Blues Quartet appeared here Saturday. This is one of the finest attractions of the kind that has every visited Chautauqua, and we hope to see them again
    • Mr. & Mrs. Hinchliff have been with us sine the opening of the session and have won a place in the hearts of our people which reminds of the fondness with which we regarded Mr. & Mrs. Peters in years past
    • Miss. Lahrmer lost none of her popularity with Chautauqua goers.  In fact, she seems to improve with each appearance.  As a child impersonator she is an easy winner for the best we ever saw.
    • Dr. Byron W. King is here and is scheduled to make his first appearance on the program tonight.  The Shakespearean plays by his School of Oratory constituted some of our best attractions a year ago, and we are anticipating some rare treats from the Doctor and his class during the present session
    • Next Saturday is Educational day and the program opens with a grand rally of the county superintendents of West Florida at 11:30 and with music by soloists and the orchestra.  2:30 is the concert by the Oxford Company, 3:30 is a lecture by Hon. Henry Houck, 4:30 is a Special meeting for school teachers.  At  7:00 Entertainment begins with scientific demonstrations, wireless telegraphy, electric bell, chimes and piano, experiments with powerful magnets and many interesting and entertaining exhibitions.  Prof Louis Williams assisted by the Oxford Company and Walo’s Orchestra
    • Messrs. A. W. Powell and H. Powell of Dorcas were in town last Tuesday
  • A Beautiful Home Wedding (1)
    • The many friends of Mr. Austin Ames will read with interest the following account of his marriage which occurred at Hickory, N.C. on Jan. 28.The clipping is taken from a paper published there.
    • Miss. Grace Johnson and Mr. A. R. Ames were married January 28th at 2:00 at the home of the bride’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. F. P. Johnson
    • The parlor and hall were tastefully decorated in white and yellow chrysanthemums and potted plants
    • The bridal party entered to the strains of Mendelssom’s wedding march played by Mrs. John D. Williams
    • First little Elizabeth Harding came in with the ring in a luster of narcissus.  Next the maid of honor, Miss. Alice Witherspoon and groomsman, Lawrence Cline.  Then the groom and his best man, Mr. Frank Johnson Jr.  The bride entered on the arm of her father who gave her away
    • The bride wore a blue suit with hat and gloves to match, and carried a bouquet of narcissus and maiden-hair fern.
    • The impressive ring ceremony was used by the bride’s pastor, Rev. Garth.  Hearts and Flowers was played softly during the ceremony.  The party left in an automobile for Newton where they took the train for Columbia, Chester and other points south.  They will make their home in Lenoir
    • It was a beautiful home wedding and the many friends of the happy couple wish them a long and happy life.
  • From A Visitor (1)
    • T. H. Hagerty visited the educational institutions of DeFuniak Springs and wrote a letter to the editor of the Herald reviewing the schools
    • The college has a bright future and benefits the whole state of Florida with the individuals it educates.
    • The state is doing a good job with the high school, which educates a multitude of students, and the high school should be considered one of the city’s richest assets
    • The students attending the Thomas Industrial Institute appear as though they will contribute to Florida’s rise among the states of the union.  The students there are working their way by their own industry, and their work is commendable. Putting forth personal effort at a young age should enable them to be independent for the rest of their lives
    • Hagerty knew Rev. Thomas, for whom the school was named, and hopes the people of DeFuniak will continue to support the school financially and with words of appreciation.
  • The Country Wants This Motto (1)
    • At frequent intervals a congressman will put forth the suggestion to remove the phrase “in God we trust” from the money.
    • The newspapers of the country respond to line up discussion and debate, but by the time that happens, the resolution has been forgotten by Congress.
    • The phrase is honored in the hearts of the American people, and reflects the country’s “refreshing return to old-fashioned, flat-footed religion”
    • William Bryan once said that “Man needs faith in God to strengthen him to his hours of trial and he needs it to give him courage to do the world of life.”  He said that faith gives men the reassurance that right will triumph, and they are given the courage to fight for what is right, even though they don’t know if they’ll survive the battle.
    • This doctrine is acceptable to the American people, and they want their belief in the motto, “In God We Trust.”
  • Local Blurbs (2)
    • Mr. J. D. Sellars announces his candidacy for County Commissioner from District No. 3 and solicits your support in the Democratic primary election
    • See the announcement this week of Mr. T. M. Trotman, who is a candidate for Supervisor of Registration. He is a deserving young man, has the misfortune to be a cripple, and will appreciate your support in the Democratic primary
    • The announcement of Mr. W. P. Belkom for County Commissioner from District No. 2 appears this week in our announcement column.  “Uncle Bud” is a good substantial citizen, a successful farmer and familiar with the needs of his district.  He is a good man for the office and will be hard to beat.
    • The announcement of Rev. Daniel Anderson for Representative appears in this issue of The Herald.  Mr. Anderson had repeatedly declined to enter the race, but while attending the big Masonic convention held the past week he was so strenuously by representative citizens from all sections of the county to enter the race that he finally consented to let his friends announce his candidacy.  Mr. Anderson is a citizen who has always identified with everything that has stood for the best interests of the people of Walton County He numbers his friends by the score among the best people of all sections of the county.  He made a most creditable race for state senator two years ago and is perhaps the strongest man the Democrats could put out for representative.
  • New Dictionary (2)
    • One of the Webster boys (Noah or Dan) once promulgated a dictionary to define certain words.  He lived and worked some time between the flood and primary election, and so the work has been impaired by extreme old age.
    • The Herald, believing all men to be created equal and so anyone can put together a dictionary, presents a free listing of definitions for the readers/
    • Attorney- said to be a lawyer.  The word is derived from the Ueechee verb “turn” illustrated by an attorney’s ability to “turn” in any direction and to lie with equal facility on either side.
    • Candidate- a newspaper man with the jim-jams
    • Office- a snap, a plum, a cinch, a graff.  Much striven for by men who don’t like to plow corn or do any other kind of hard work.  Generally held by a “mut” who is related to somebody
    • Gink- a bright youth whose parents ought never to have married. An imbecile indeed in whom is no guile.  The “gink” differs from the lunatic in that he is born without brains and never acquires any.  Is sometimes a shining light in the Sabbath school, but a total blank everywhere else. Can give you the exact date and place when he first experienced a knowledge of saving grace in the forgiveness of sins, but couldn’t to save his life tell you the difference between income tax and nebular hypothesis. Is very fond of listening to his own voice.
    • Editor- a demented anthropoid endowed with a nickel’s worth of brains and an overwhelming desire to run for office of some kind.  Has semi lucid intervals at which times he imagines that he has a great many “friends” who are just dying to elect him.  Sometimes writes pieces for his own paper and fondly imagines that his editorial utterances may someday set a river afire.  An editor is a “gink” suffering with paralysis of the brain and St. Vitus’ dance.
    • Pool-Room- A device for demonstrating the truth of a adage that a fool and his money are soon parted.
    • Homestead- A variety of shell-game in which the United States bet a man 160 acres of land against a few dollars that he can’t stay on the land and make a living for five consecutive years.
    • Cider- a decoction of white oak bark, red pepper, and stump-water.  Very popular as a beverage in prohibition towns, especially among gentlemen who wear old clothes.
    • Merchant- A man who gets rich by buying for cash and selling below cost.
    • Gentleman- a business man who advertises in the Herald
    • Contemporary- a term used by newspaper men to designate a rival who is too vile and loathsome to be called anything else.
  • Whoop ‘Em Up (2)
    • If Bill Mapoles accepts the challenge, the people of DeFuniak have a rare treat in store for Saturday, April 18th.  Mr. Storrs has invited him to meet him at the court house on that date to debate.  The editor thinks its alright, but tends to be a stickler for the eternal fitness of things, and so suggests the date be April First, for obvious reasons.
  • The Commissioners (2)
    • No special business took place at the meeting of the Commissioners  last Monday
    • If not for R. W. Storrs performance in attempting to get the board to reconsider giving the Herald status as official newspaper, the meeting would have been featureless.
    • The poor farm will receive an additional dollar per month per inmate for maintenance
    • Overseers were ordered to work all hands at the same time on the public roads, except in cases where the number of hands is sufficiently large to make more than one squad
    • The bond of H. J. Henderson as notary public was approved.
    • Svea was made a new precinct.
    • The Jones’ burned fence, which was the cause of some pretty heated remarks at the February meeting, was “thrown out of court” so to speak, as the Board did not consider that Mr. Jones had any grounds for damages against the county.
    • The matter of a division of the road tax was held up pending legal advice in the premises.
  • Changed Hands (2)
    • Uncle Henry Wadsworth bought the livery stable business from Bud Adams.
    • Some of the Crackerbox Club sees it as high treason, but some think Uncle Henry will grant the same concessions to the club as already exist, though he will stipulate that the club furnish its own tobacco and whittling material.
  • Mason Meeting (2)
    • DeFuniak was well filled with the mason the first of the week for the Masonic School of Instruction, which was in session here for several days.
    • The visiting Masons are a fine looking bunch of men and most of the local members of the order are fairly human in appearance.
  • Church Directory (2)
    • Lists events and times for the Methodist Church, Baptist Church, Presbyterian Church, Universalist Church, and Episcopal Church
  • Miss. Berry Entertains (4)
    • Miss. Ossie Berry hosted the “Backwoods Party” for the College Club, and it was one of the most enjoyable affairs of the season.
    • Students entered through the dialog room and were greeted with “goodnight.”
    • All the students were dignified, despite wearing all their clothes backwards.
    • Everyone received a specific number of beans, and if he used a negative or affirmative expression that night, he must forfeit a bean to the person who hears him.
    • The Students attempted a grand march backwards, but found it difficult and gave up.
    • Punch was served, as well as a dainty salad course served on an upside down plate
    • After that the students gathered and were randomly divided into the “Do Littles” and “Done Mores” and they yelled chants at each other.
  • Card of Thanks (4)
    • Mrs. Sarah Nowlin wishes to thank the people of DeFuniak for their generosity in raising $106 for her with which to pay off a mortgage on her home.

Compiled by Emily Petroskey

The DeFuniak Herald – February 29, 1914 – Article excerpts

Article Excerpts

  •  Tourists’ Club (1)
    • Our Northern Visitors Organize
    • Meetings to be held every Wednesday Afternoon
    • A number of northern tourists and citizens of DeFuniak coming from other states met in Alpine park last Thursday afternoon, January 29 with the various northern states represented as follows: Indiana, Illinois, Iowa, Michigan, Missouri, Ohio, Nouth Dakota, Maine, West Virginia, Minnesota, New York. (names listed under each state, most from Ohio)
    • Total Membership: 60
    • Officers elected are W.R. Thatcher, president; W.V. Hadley, vice president; S.M. Terry, Secretary; and G. Wade, Treasurer
    • The object of the club is to enable the tourists to come together once a week to socialize.
    • Weekly meetings to be held Wednesday afternoons, the first being held yesterday afternoon at the Hotel Walton. The next meeting will be held at the Armory
  • Bold Theft (1)
    • A thief stole a good suit of clothes last Monday morning from the premises of Mr. C.E. Hewitt, at the corner of Nelson Ave and 4th St.
    • Mr. Hewitt’s new suit had been hung out on a line to air when it was stolen.
    • Bloodhounds were brought out but failed to catch a scent
    • At this time of year, Florida is pretty well filled with tramps and “that specimen of near trap known as the pencil vendor, the umbrella mender, the itinerant corn doctor and other such dangerous and suspicious characters.”
    • When one of these people loiters around your home or place of business, call the marshal and have him sent to jail or out of town, and keep valuables out of sight.
    • There have been several thefts like this in DeFuniak this winter.
  • Tax Notice (1)
    • D.A. Gillis, Tax Assessor, and James  A. McLean will be at the following places on the following dates to assess taxes for 1914 and collect taxes for 1913:
    • Freeport on February 9, Portland on February 10, Santa Rosa on February 11, Niceville on February 12, Pt. Washington on February 13.
  • Fire Sunday Night (1)
    • A fire last Sunday night burned the top off the old Len Richards building, located at the corner of Nelson Ave and 11th St, near Beach, Rogers and Co.’s plainer
  • County Fathers (1)
    • County Commissioners met last Monday/Tuesday
    • Very busy and productive day: the Herald was designated as the paper for doing the official printing this year.
    • The voting place in Alaqua precinct No. 8 is moved to the Jack Henderson place
    • The county is appropriating $125 as a supplement to the state appropriation for Canning Club work in Walton County
  • See the Point? (1)
    • Story of a farmer ordering goods from elsewhere being harassed by a local merchant about not buying local, and the farmer replies he didn’t know the merchant sold what he needed, he should have advertised in the local paper.
    • McAllister (Okla.) Bulletin
  • Up Against It (2)
    • Superintendent Trotman stated that Defuniak’s special school district needs $1740, making some provision fro the special tax warrants to be taken up, or the seven lowest grades will be discontinued.
    • If the city can raise $1000 the school board will handle the situation, and needs to be handled at once, because teachers can’t be expected to work without pay.
  • School Districts (2)
    • Walton County school districts have been recently rearranged and are now composed of the cities as follows
    • District 1: Gaskin, Darlington, Glendale, Ealum, Argyle, Eucheeanna, Moores, Knox  Hill
    • District 2: Paxton, Laurel Hill, Yellow River, Shoal River, Crestview, Boggy Bayou, Mossy Head
    • District 3: DeFuniak, Alaqua, Freeport, Portland, Mossy Head, Bruce, Pt. Washington, Santa Rosa
  • Good Road (2)
    • Despite bad weather, the recent work done by DeFuniak citizens on Eucheeanna road done on the 21st of last November is holding up well.
    • The Herald editor, being fierce and unterrified, inspected it himself and believes if any attention were given to the road, it would hold up well in comparison to other roads
  • Family Reunion (2)
    • At Dorcas on January 27th, the Hinote connection held a reunion.
    • They celebrated the 81st birthday of Mrs. Mariah Hinote, who has resided at Dorcas for the past 25 years.
    • Sixty-two of her descendants were present, forty were absent, and sixteen have died, bringing the grand total of descendants to 118.
    • Mrs. Hinote is the mother of Mrs. Alex McCallum of Dorcas, who was born in Georgia 61 years ago.
  • 50thAnniversary (2)
    • At the next meeting of Felton Lodge No. 63 Knights of Pythias, they will be discussing how to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the founding of the order.
    • The celebration will be held the night of the 19th of March.
    • The organization is being renewed with improved attendance and a determination to get down to business.
  • W. C. T. U. (2)
    • Last Tuesday at the home of Mrs. John Richardson, a large gathering of ladies spent the afternoon discussing the work of the Women’s Christian Temperance Union and the hopes and plans for another year.  Short and informal addresses were given
    • Mrs. Manning, the local president was very happy with the promised help from the members.
    • Mrs. Murphy of St. Louis gave a short but impressive address, and it was decided to hold a Williard memorial service in two weeks.
    • After the program ladies adjourned to the dining room for a buffet luncheon was served.
  • Church Directory (2)
    • Lists events and times for the Methodist Church, Baptist Church, Presbyterian Church, Universalist Church, and Episcopal Church
  • Local Blurbs (2)
    • The announcement column includes Herman Bludworth’s campaign announcement for re-election.  He  has one term of excellent service, which is a stronger recommendation than any the Herald could give
    • Mr. James L. Clary is entering politics with his announcement to run for Tax Collector.  He is very popular and that will help his campaign
    • Mr. A. W. Powell is running for County Commissioner.  He is competent man and promises to serve the interests of the county faithfully.
  • Let the Hide Go With the Hair: Again, What the Records Show (5)
    •  Letter and political advertisement from W.H. Mapoles
    • C.D. Meigs, Herman Bludworth, J.C. Steel and J. J. Ward are trying to make him the scapegoat for the passing of the unpopular Senate Bill No. 431, which he says was drawn from the diction of these commissioners by W. W. Flournoy and passed though the senate by Mr. H. H. Lindsey.
    • According to excerpts printed rom the House Journal of May 11, 1913, the only road law Mr. Mapoles was involved with was House Bill 808, entitled An Act to Amend Chapter 6315, Laws of Florida Approved June 6, 1911, being an act entitled “An Act to provide for the (illegible) and method  of operating, establishing, building, constructing and mainstaining public roads and bridges in Walton County Florida.”
    • The full text of the Bill 808 is printed.
  • Effective Advertising , Something Our Town Has Long Needed (6)
    • Mr. J. Leslie Taylor of Chicago whose presence in our city was noted in those columns last week, is interesting the people of DeFuniak Springs in an advertising proposition, which should benefit the town and county.
    • People’s response shows an awakening interest in practical advertising which will bring families to DeFuniak
    • Mr. Taylor informed the Herald that the cost of producing a book of descriptive advertising matter is small and if it is agreeable to others, he should have no difficulty raising the amount needed to print 10,000 copies guaranteed, though that number might not be enough to properly advertise DeFuniak Springs
    • The Herald surmises that the people in the north have long had their eyes on Florida, and a sufficient quantity of books will be needed to reach them.
    • The Editor of the Herald only owns one piece of real estate, a burial lot in the cemetery, and he will contribute $5 in the hopes that the money for books will be raised by June 1st.  The difference in the size of his property compared to the readers shows the proportion for what readers should contribute.
    • The Editor won’t directly benefit from contributions, as the printing will be done in Chicago, but everyone will generally benefit from the advertising.
  • Bold Robbery, Jackson’s Store Burglarized Second Time Within Three Months (6)
    • R.H. Jackson’s grocery store was robbed presumably last Saturday night when a thief removed a pane of glass from a rear window.
    • Dogs taken to the scene were unable to catch a scent on Monday morning, which suggests the robbery took place Saturday.
    • $5.30 was left in the cash drawer by Mr. Jackson when he closed the store, and that’s all that’s been discovered taken, though some attempt was made to get into the safe.
    • The same store was burglarized three months ago, though then it was kept quiet in hopes of catching the thief.
  • Residence Sold (6)
    • Messrs Frank and Walter Cawthon purchased Mr. J. J. Meig’s residence o n the corner of Nelson Avenue and Seventh Street, which is currently occupied by the family of Mr. G. H. Campbell.
  • Robbed the “Dixie” (6)
    • A gentle thieflet broke into the Dixie Drug Company’s store last Sunday night and stole several dollars worth of small change left in the cash register.
    • The burglar entered through a window in Dr. McKinnon’s office.
    • Robberies are coming to be uncomfortably frequent lately; A few weeks ago $35 in cash was stolen from the passenger depot and about the same amount was recently stolen from Mr. L. F. Cochran’s jewelry store while he was at supper.
    • If these crimes are committed by one person, the thief is making pretty good wages.
  • Mr. Infinger Dead (6)
    • Mr. Clark Infinger died Friday night at his home in Alaqua, and was buried at the Alaqua church Saturday afternoon at 4:00.
    • “Uncle Clark” had reached 83 years old and had been in poor health for some time.
    • He is survived by a number of children, all of whom are grown.
  • Blurb (6)
    • Remember the speaking next Saturday at Laurel Hill.
    • This gives everybody a good chance to hear Bill Maples crow on his own perch.  Everybody go.
  • Managers and Clerks of the Primary Election to be Held June 2, 1914 (6)
    • No. 1 Knox Hill
      • M. K .Rushing
      • E. V. Crawford
      • H. A. McDonald, managers
      • W. M. Smith, clerk
    • No. 2 Eucheeanna
      • G. D. W. Rushing
      • J. D. Anderson
      • Lee Lindsey, managers
      • E. R. Ward, clerk
    • No. 3 Glendale
      • B.G. Bell
      • J. L. Edwards
      • Noah Smith, managers
      • J. F. Howell, clerk
    • No. 4 Darlington
      • D. B. Miles
      • C. J. Sutton
      • Henry Scott, managers
      • Angus Green, clerk
    • No. 5 Paxton
      • J. M Fountain
      • B. B. Miller
      • Frank Harrison, managers
      • W. B. Miller, clerk
    • No. 6 Yellow River
      • W. A. Campbell
      • Tom Clary
      • T. Holley, managers
      • John Moore, clerk
    • No. 7 Shoal River
      • J. W. McSwain
      • J. M Miller
      • John McCallum,  managers
      • J. J. Ellis, clerk
    •  No. 8 Alaqua
      • E. W. Adkison
      • R. F. Owens
      • C. E. Infinger, managers
      • Lee Trotman, clerk
    • No. 9 Boggy
      • W. F. McGriff
      • J. F. Allen
      • S. S. Spence, managers
      • B. P. Edge, clerk
    • No 10 Portland
      • Ben King
      • H. Jernigan
      • W. J. Kelly, managers
      • J. W. Kelly, clerk
    • No. 11 Freeport
      • J. J. McCaskill, Jr.
      • H. D. Donaldson
      • E. H. Miller, managers
      • W. T. Morris, clerk
    • No. 12 Mossy Bend
      • Jackson Grice
      • W. D. Rigdon
      • J. R. Brown, managers
      • John F. Grice, clerk
    • No. 13 Bruce
      • John Pate
      • John F. Silcox
      • W. J. Ward Jr. Managers
      • H. A. Varnum, clerk
    • No. 14 DeFuniak
      • M. T. King
      • Chas. Murray Jr.
      • J. B. Morrison, managers
      • Walter Cawthon, clerk
    • No. 15 Crestview
      • J. T. Green
      • A. P. Cutts
      • Willie Edge, managers
      • J. D. Cobb, clerk
    • No. 16 Mossy Head
      • W. E Nichols
      • A. J. Covington
      • Jack Richardson, managers
      • H. P. Turner, clerk
    • No. 17 Ealum
      • Horace Jones
      • W. J. Daughtry
      • H. C. Miller, managers
      • D. L. Calvin, clerk
    • No. 18 Laurel Hill
      • H. M. Stokes
      • P. J. Steele
      • A. D. Campbell, managers
      • Mack Tyner, clerk
    • No. 19 Moores
      • A. A. McLean
      • A. Moore
      • J. J. Byrd, managers
      • D. P. Vaughn, clerk
    • No. 20 Gaskin
      • Arnie Pryor
      • Jake Griffith
      • K. W. Johnson, managers
      • R. W. Parish, clerk
    • No. 21 Pt. Washington
      • H. F. Wise
      • G. W. Umderwood
      • S. A. Wesley, managers
      • W. H. Wesley, clerk
    • No 22 Santa Rosa
      • W. D. Lower
      • C. T. Nutting
      • Owen M. Allen, managers
      • Wm. M. Wilson, clerk
    • No. 23 Argyle
      • G. M Bishop
      • W. D. McLean
      • J. W. Helms, managers
      • T. S. Merritt, clerk
    • Published by Chas. H. Gordon, Clerk Board County Commissioners
  • Cowpeas for Hot Pasture (7)
    • Florida farmers should supply hogs with green pastures rather than dry food, which isn’t as thrifty won’t make them grow as much.
    • The cowpea does well in warm sandy areas, especially Florida, and is a short season crop, which takes 60-90 days to mature, depending on the specific variety
    • It can be planted during the season in between rows or after the spring and summer harvests
    • When planted as food for hogs, cowpeas can be planted any time from mid-March to early August, and are best planted in two week intervals to keep pastures green.
    • Planting:
      • Cowpeas are best planted in a well plowed seed bed in rows 2-2.5 feet apart.
      • ½ a bushel per acre is ideal distribution.
      • When the plants reach 1-2 inches high, cultivate them once or twice.
      • At 15-18 inches high, pasturing can begin, which should be 6-8 weeks after planting.
    • Varieties
      • Many varieties exists, though some are better suited to this area than others
      • Out of 150 varieties tested, the Brabiam? and Iron grew best
    • Fertilization
      • Fertilization is unnecessary unless they are planted in poor, sandy soil.
  • Bad Money (7)
    • An unknown man presented an altered two dollar bill which had been changed to a twenty  at the Big Store yesterday
    • Before he could be pulled, he disappeared with his bad currency.
  • Lost (7)
    • On February 14, somewhere between the depot and her home, Miss. Gussie McCall lost a cold handled parasol with her home engraved on the handle
    • A reward is offered for its return
  • Japanese Foreign Affairs (7)
    • The Japanese minister of foreign affairs, Baron Mikano, spoke in the imperial parliament on January 21st regarding the unsatisfactory condition of the negotiations with the United States over the alien land laws of California.  It is declared at Washington that an attempt will be made to reach a basis of agreement with Japan on this difficult point
  • Look Out (8)
    • In about three weeks there will be big events taking place in DeFuniak, though the event is very secret for now and may be complicated by the Mexican situation and may involve foreign nations.
    • Next week the Herald will reveal what’s going on, though they have been warned that “the worst is yet to come.”

Compiled by Emily Petroskey

The DeFuniak Herald – February 26, 1914 – Article excerpts

Contributed by Emily Petroskey

 

Article Excerpts

  • Golden Jubilee (1)
    • Last Monday night at 8 o’clock the Knights of Pythias of No. 63 entertained at a banquet to celebrate the Golden Jubilee, the 50th anniversary of the order
    • They met in the castle hall where ceremonies were conducted by Chancellor CommanderW. Thornler and his brother officers, and guests were lectured on the origin and teachings of the order, including the significance of the colors, blue yellow and red as symbols of friendship, charity and benevolence.
    • After the ceremonies they went to the Hotel Walton for a banquet.  The dining room was decorated in Pythian colors and red poppies, violets and vases of jonquils were scattered throughout the room.
    • After the feast was served in several courses, speeches began.  Mr. Thornber was toastmaster.  Mr. Storrs gave the first speech on the history of the order, focusing on its distinctly American past, having formed after the civil war to heal the wounds of bitterness caused by the conflict.  Messrs. D.S. Gillis, Kenneth Bruce and Rev. S. J. Catts also spoke.
  • Life Certificate (1)
    • Miss. Myrtle Warren has been grated a state life certificate by the State Board of Education.
    • A Life Certificate enables the honoree to teach at any Florida school without requiring further examination.
    • Miss. Warren’s is the 100th certificate issued since the practice began in 1894, and the third certificate given to a Walton county teacher, the first two belonging to Miss. Chrissie Gillis and Prof. Neal of the High School.
  • The Speaking  (1)
    • Organizer John A. Curry of Texas and Capt. Eric Von Axelson and other Socialists of Walton County visited DeFuniak Monday.
    • Mr. Curry spoke at the courthouse at 8 o’clock.
    • Due to the Knights of Pythias celebration taking place the same night, the turnout was smaller than it might have been, but those in attendance were well entertained by Mr. Curry’s speech on the subject of Socialism.  He will be returning again to deliver another address.
  • Died (1)
    • Mr. A. M. Chapman of Chapel Hill, SC, father of Rev. Thomas Chapman of this city, died Sunday.
    • Mr. Chapman spent the winter here with the family of his son three years ago.
    • Rev. Chapman was holding services at Florala when notified of his father’s death.
  • Free Lecture (1)
    • A free lecture, “The Message of the Hour,” by C.A. Wise of Indianapolis, Ind., to be held at the Star Theater at 3:00 PM Sunday, March 1st.  All are invited and should bring a friend.
  • $2,000 Bond (2)
    • Candidates for the Office of County Commissioner must qualify in a certified bond of two thousand dollars for the proper discharge of the duties of the office.  This high sum isn’t easily obtained by just anyone who feels the calling to run, and is intended to create a board of county commissioner composed of good solid men.
    • Each county commissioner must be voted for by the county at large.
  • From Mr. McSween (2)
    • To all Voters (Gentlemen) of Walton County, Florida:
    • The last primary election law adopted by the legislature known as the Bryan Primary Law is greatly misunderstood by political parties and the general population.
    • The law provides that any party polling 5% of all the votes cast constitutes a political party.
    • The Democratic Party, the Republican Party, the Bull-Moose Party and the Socialist Party are the parties that qualified.
    • There will be one primary election held for all these political parties at the same time and place, which county commissioners will decide.  This is not a Democratic primary, it is a primary for all political parties paid for by the public.
    • Any political party failing to nominate its ticket in this primary election cannot get its ticket for the general election by nomination
    • The gentlemen of other political parties should go work with their own party and build it up, let the people know what the party stands for.
    • The Democrats have sins enough of their own without being responsible for other political parties, as it has been in the past.  No one but those who voted the Democratic ticket at the last election will be allowed to vote a Democratic ticket in the next primary.
    • The Democrats propose to do the best for the people they can and not impose on your parties.
    • John C. McSween, Chairman Democratic Committee
  • Chautauqua (2)
    • The 1914 Annual Session Opened Last Night
    • Good Audience Despite Threatening Aspect of Weather
    • The 29th annual session of the Florida Chautauqua opened last night to good attendance despite the inclemency of the weather, which was most likely the worst ever for an opening night.
    • Mayor Gillis delivered an address of welcome, followed by brief addresses from Rev. Lynn R. Walker, president of Palmer College, and Superintendent Kenneth Bruce.
    • The speeches were interspersed with selections from the orchestra, impersonations by Miss. Lahrmer and vocal selections by Mr. & Mrs. Hinchliff
    • The evening programs begin strictly on time, as the editor learned last night when he was 10 minutes late and missed the Mayor’s speech.
    • Everyone should be buying tickets and telling everyone else to buy tickets, which is a good business decision and the right thing to do.  The men of DeFuniak are responsible for making up the difference between the sale of tickets and $4,000.  This should be considered before making negative comments about the institution that “made” DeFuniak.
    • Pomahasika was supposed to appear next Saturday, but has died and his place on the program will have to be filled in with some other attraction.
  • Revival Closed (2)
    • The revival services at the Presbyterian Church finished last Sunday evening.
    • Evangelist Rev. Dr. Richardson of Nashville worked hard and forty people joined the church.
    • On the last day around $7,000 was pledged to enlarge and improve the church building.  Though plans haven’t been adopted officially, a Sunday school room and other additions will probably be made to the church building.
    • Rev. Robert Stuart Saunders resigned, so Dr. Richardson has been engaged as evangelist for this Presbytery, and the revival was the first work he has done since taking the position.
  • Constitution of Florida A Farce (2)
    • Editor Storrs reports the supreme court passed on the Walton County Road Law.
    • J.F. Richbourg believes that the court has ruled on an unconstitutional law, and must have been drunk on bad whiskey or have the spirit of a monarch.
    • The constitution on this point is only a referendum. Advertise a local law sixty days so the people can acquiesce or reject it.
    • He has taken an oath to uphold the constitution, and the higher court by extension, but if they are right, the constitution is a farce and he is wrong, otherwise he is right and they are wrong.
    • Richbourg promises to abide by the constitution, regardless of what men say.
    • “Let us prosecute but never persecute.”
  • Unveiling (2)
    • Local Woodmen and the sovereigns of neighboring camps, as well as the general public, are invited to attend the unveiling of the monument to the memory of Sovereign P. W. Richardson at the DeFuniak Cemetery at 2:30 PM on Sunday March 8th.
  • Church Directory (2)
    • Lists events and times for the Methodist Church, Baptist Church, Presbyterian Church, Universalist Church, and Episcopal Church
  • Apportionment of Funds (3)
    • Made under Section 24, Chapter 4322 Laws of Florida 1895 shoing the amount of taxes charged to the Tax Collector of Walton County, Florida to be collected for the years of 1911, 1912, and 1913
  • Statement (3)
    • Statement of the condition of the Cawthon State Bank of DeFuniak Springs, FL at the close of business February 11th, 1914, as condensed from the Bank Examiner’s report
  • What Mapoles Will Advocate if Re-Elected (4)
    • If re-elected, W.J. Mapoles will try to appeal the road law of Walton County, which passed over his objections, and instead favor the general rad law of 1913, which allows County Commissioners to control road work and eliminate the use of boys under age 21 to work the roads.
    • He believes voters should have the right to nominate the county commissioners, but advocates the law providing they are nominated by voters of a district should be repealed, because the decisions of the commissioners affect the whole county.  He also believes commissioners should be residents of their districts.
    • Mapoles thinks State taxes should come from the public service corporations and from licenses.  County taxes should be raised by assessment of the property of the people in each county.  This eliminates the practice of paying property taxes to both the state and county.  The bill separating the two only lacked a few votes in the last session.
    • Public officials should be given salaries, rather than basing wages on the fee system, which incentivizes petty offenses at the taxpayers expense.
    • Mapoles promises to try to repeal the Bryan Primary Bill, which passed despite his protests, and he calls it the worst bill ever passed in the state.
    • He will try to repeal the game law and instead prohibit the killing of any kind of game for at least two years.
    • He reminds voters to participate in the Primary of June 2, 1914, and tells them if they are registered as Democrats they can’t vote for him.
  • Craps (4)
    • Mr. Jeff Anderson discovered a group of juvenile crap-shooters while walking in the old Woods pasture.  He thinks that if he chose to reveal their identities, their parents would be surprised to know what their boys do on Sundays

The DeFuniak Herald – February 19, 1914 – Article excerpts

Contributed by Emily Petroskey

 

Article Excerpts

  • All-The Year Schools (1)
    • Philander P. Claxton, United States Commissioner of Education, believes closing the schools during the summer is a waste of billions of dollars and is a primitive and outdated practice kept alive by tradition
    • He believes that a true “continuance school” will be more of “a direct play time, with vocational culture, physical training, school gardens, directed reading, singing, folk dancing, …(illegible)… lively drills in spelling and mental arithmetic.  Courses of brief lectures on hygiene, civil government, current events and in many schools moving pictures will be used.”
    • Miami Metropolis Article
  • For Handicapped Women (1)
    • Great strides have been made in caring for people with physical handicaps, but attention needs to now be given to women who are handicapped by circumstance rather than physical disability.
    • Women who must support themselves due to extenuating circumstances struggle to find work, often because of age and lack of skill.
    • The Women’s Educational and Industrial Union of Boston is an organization working to help women who have skills apply them to various jobs so they can make an independent living.
    • Youth’s Companion Article
  • Local Blurbs (2)
    • Hon. Bill Mapoles was in the Southeastern portion of the county the first of the week, Messrs. James A. McLean and P.A. Gillis in the northwest and James A. Clary in DeFuniak
    • Mr. & Mrs. Henry Henderson from the northern end of the county visited DeFuniak Monday and stopped by the Herald.  Henry changed the subject when asked about any political participation this year.
    • Mr. P.A. Gillis will be running for re-election as Tax Assessor, and has made a competent official and promises his best service
    • Mr. James A McLean will be running for Tax Collector, and has a record to recommend him.
    • Judge Porter of Grand Ridge was here Tuesday to attend the trustee’s meeting of Palmer College
    • A cement gutter is being built along the north side of Baldwin Avenue.  This is one of the many changes to DeFuniak’s streets in the past five years, and it is difficult for some to understand how people ever made it through the sand.
    • A band of wandering musicians playing an accordion, a bass guitar and an instrument similar to a fife passed through the first of the week.
    • The socialists of Walton county began campaigning in Laurel Hill last night.  State Organizer John A. Curry spoke, and will be in DeFuniak Monday night.  The Herald speculates their campaign will be aided by fake democrats who have been secretly sabotaging the Democratic party for years.  The Herald urges Democrats to register now.
    • Editor Mapoles of the Laurel Hill News and Editor Storrs of the DeFuniak Breeze are accusing each other of being the biggest liar.  The Herald editor shames them for their bickering and suggests they put it to a vote.
    • Chatauqua begins next Wednesday and everyone should attend to show their support for an institution that has greatly benefitted DeFuniak and West Florida.
  • Post Office Buildings (2)
    • Reprint of an editorial by George Fitch in the New Orleans Daily States, of interest to DeFuniak because a new post office is expected to be built soon.
    • Fitch believes the United States Government spends extravagant sums of money to build post offices around the country, and the finished building is never near as grand or practical as the apportionment sums would indicate.  The same amount spent on a private building would be a grand structure, but when spent building a post office often results in a “modest coop.”
    • The buildings come in different and often displeasing designs, but the one detail they have in common is their location in remote areas away from the business district.
  • Tax Deeds May Be Void (2)
    • A court case in the Supreme Court of Florida will decide whether or not tax deeds issued since 1907 are void because of technicalities.  The case specifically applies to Duval County, but the same errors have most likely been made in every county.
    • The court case in Duval declared that the tax sale was not properly advertised; County commissioners didn’t decide on a newspaper to print the tax list at the beginning of the year.  Also the court “held that five consecutive weeks meant not only a publication of five weeks but that there must intervene between the first date of publication and the day on which the lands are sold 35 days.
    • In this case the list was published 5 times but there were not 35 days intervening so the tax deed issued was void.
    • Miami Metropolis Article
  • Apportionment of Funds (3)
    • Made under Section 24, Chapter 4322 Laws of Florida 1895 shoing the amount of taxes charged to the Tax Collector of Walton County, Florida to be collected for the years of 1911, 1912, and 1913
  • Statement (3)
    • Statement of the condition of the Cawthon State Bank of DeFuniak Springs, FL at the close of business February 11th, 1914, as condensed from the Bank Examiner’s report
  • Church Directory (4)
    • Lists events and times for the Methodist Church, Baptist Church, Presbyterian Church, Universalist Church, and Episcopal Church

The DeFuniak Herald – February 12, 1914 – Article Excerpts

Contributed by Emily Petroskey

 

Article Excerpts

  • How Weather Forecasts are made in the U.S. (1)
    • Not a mysterious/occult process, no readings of planets and moon
    • Very businesslike, just as a business man can calculate the arrival of an order from a foreign country, forecasters track the progress and rate of storms and weather heading towards the U.S. from foreign countries
    • Unexpected conditions delay or change storms, just as they might change the arrival date of a businessman’s order
    • To monitor the progress of a cold wave, the Weather Bureau must monitor reports from various countries
    • Flood forecasts are made in a similar way, by tracking rainfall through reports from local observers at the head waters of streams to calculate what levels will be when they reach a main channel.
  • Palmer Notes (1)
    • Mr. Bruce began his course of literary lectures at the college last Wednesday on “What to Read and How to Read”
    • Mr. Ross Helm is the new baseball coach
    • Rev. S. Catts conducted chapel services one day last week
    • Mr. Walker conducted his usual Bible class last Wednesday
    • The College Club gave an oyster supper in McCaskill Hall last Saturday night for the benefit of athletics
    • The two literary societies will meet next Saturday at their prospective halls.  At the last meeting new officers were elected
    • Mr. Jordan’s music students gave a recital Tuesday evening
  • Golden Jubilee (1)
    • The local lodge, Knights of Pythias, will celebrate the Golden Jubilee of the order on the evening of the 23rd with a banquet at the Hotel Walton.
    • All KPs, visiting KPs and ex KPs are requested to register at Murray’s Restaurant or the First National Bank so invitations can be sent out.
  • An Unusual Service (1)
    • Sunday morning at the Methodist Church, there will be an installation of Officers
    • Special music will be rendered and all members are encouraged to be present.
  • Tainted Money (1)
    • The Herald refused advertising money from whiskey interests, despite the desperate need for the money
  • Two New Ones (2)
    • Hon. W.H. Mapoles is running for representative of Walton County, he is well-known, and represented Walton County in the last session of the legislature
    • Mr. Samuel J. McCall is running for Treasurer.  He is a former DeFuniak resident and the son of Mr. & Mr. J.A. McCall, and is a strong candidate
  • Stung (2)
    • An “emissary of the evil one” accused The Herald of being the only man who could beat Bill Mapoles in the election.
    • The Herald Editor declares he has no interest in influencing politics and would be a failure as a candidate
  • Who is He? (2)
    • The last issue of the Laurel Hill news mentioned that the “sorriest and least respected man in Walton County” was in Laurel Hill on Friday night, but failed to name him
    • The Herald questions his identity; Walter Matthews, Tom King, Billy Jones and the Herald Editor have all been accused of being in Laurel Hill on Friday
    • The editor requests that Brother Mapoles clear up the issue
  • Letter From Florida (2)
    • To the Editor of the Putnam (W. Va.) Leader
    • Letter describes the beauty of DeFuniak Springs and surrounding areas, including the lake and its dimensions, and the nature surrounding the Twin Lakes
    • Local Industries mentioned are the Turpentine and Lumber industries, the area produces pears, peaches, oranges, tomatoes, onions, lettuce, grapes and corn
    • L & N Railroad runs through the town, though the writer believes its shipping capabilities have not yet been fully realized, especially as far as the raising and shipping of melons and sweet potatoes are concerned.
    • The climate is warm and dry, though cooled by a breeze due to the high altitude. 2-3 crops grown per year.
    • Livestock is mostly free range and of the common sort
    • The residents are from diverse origins, and include “a great many coloured people but they seem to know their place and stay in it.”
    • A tract of 25 acres of farmland within 1 mile of town is currently selling at an asking price of $125
    • Letter written by L.A. Pittsford
  • Boy Scouts (2)
    • The Boy Scout movement has taken hold in DeFuniak Springs
    • Last Wednesday’s meeting added 6 members, bring the total to 16 plus the scout master
    • Frank Simmons is Assistant Scout Master, Clifford Meigs is patrol leader, and Joseph Walker is corporal.
    • Boy Scouts is intended to give an outlet for the savage elements/spirited natures of boys
    • Boy Scouts teaches boys teamwork, honesty, loyalty, obedience, how to have fun without hurting themselves or others, what reading material is appropriate
    • Activities include hikes in warmer weather, building fires and open cooking, learning about poisonous shrubs, and how to navigate the woods without a compass
    • Judge Edward Porters Field of the Kansas City Juveniles Court recommends participation in Boy Scouts to keep boys out of rough gangs and appearing in court; to date he claims he has never had a Boy Scout in his court.
  • Revival Services (2)
    • Rev. William H. Richardson D.D. will conduct revival services at the Presbyterian Church, he is an evangelist from Nashville, Tennessee
    • Rev. C.S. Tally, pastor of the Methodist Church will preach services Thursday night to begin the revival
    • Richardson is expected to arrive Friday morning and preach his first sermon Friday night
    • Lynn R. Walker, pastor, extends an invitation to everyone
  • Five Mules Killed (2)
    • The storm last Friday morning blew down the fire bell tower at the east end of the freight depot, which fell across and brought down electric light wires.  Contact with the wires instantly killed five mules.
    • All were dray mules, 4 belonged to Wester & Jeffries, and one to Perdue & McDonald

The DeFuniak Herald – January 29, 1914 – Article excerpts

Contributed by Emily Petroskey

 

Article Excerpts

  • Bradley Land (1)
    • Book review/summary of “The North Pole and Bradley Land” by Mr. Edwin Swift Blach
    • “an energetic attempt to rehabilitate the character of Dr. Frederick Cook” and prove he may have been the first to reach the north pole after all
    • Cook’s discovery of a land he calls, “Bradley Land” can by confirmed by future explorers
    • Cook’s claims can’t be disproved, so Blach concludes they must be true
  • Chautauqua: A Great Educational Rally (1)
    • Will be held March 5, 6, and 7, according to the resolution passed at a meeting held by the teachers of West Florida and Superintendents of the counties
    • 300-400 teachers expected Thursday and Friday, and 1000 on Saturday
    • Opportunity for teachers to meet and exchange ideas
    • Hon. Henry Houck will be a speaker, he has been prominently connected to educational matters of the State of Pennsylvania for 30 years and is a friend of Dr. Byron W. King and Mr. Bruce
    • Dr. Byron W. King will also speak, he is very popular at education rallies and has spoken at more than 100 events over the past 40 years
    • Mr. Crane of Mississippi will be conducting work on the development of the child mind, “Child Psychology”
    • Lectures on “Child Labor” and “Progressivism” will be given by Gertrude Valdemar
    • Chautauqua orchestra, soloists and readers will perform
    • Walton county schools will close so teachers can attend, but will be paid for the days off.  Other West Florida counties considering closing as well
    • Special rates available for teachers at hotels and boarding houses, and all West Florida teachers will receive a complimentary ticket
    • For more information contact D. Trotman, Superintendent of Public Instruction, Walton County, FL
    • Program of events printed below
  • Graceful Act (2)
    • Glen Saint Marry Nurseries gave a ½ price discount on Satsuma orange trees to the Thomas Industrial Institute and made Miss. Steptoe Campbell a gift of 42 ornamental trees and shrubs for the institute
    • It was a graceful and much appreciated gesture
  • Cawthon State Bank (2)
    • The January edition of the Southern Banker included a positive description of the new Cawthon State Bank building
    • The banking room is the handsomest in West Florida, and the new building is both bank and office
    • The business began in 1908 as W.L. Cawthon private bank, incorporated in April, 1913, deposits are now $125,000
    • W.L. Cawthon is founder and president, Chas. H. Gordon is vice-president, and Howard L. Cawthon is cashier
    • New building is floored with mosaic tile, has marble baseboard surmounted by wainscoting of dark oak, perfect lighting and ventilation; the vault, safe and other safekeeping equipment are of the latest and most modern designs
  • This New Medicine Saves You Money (2)
    • Local druggists make money off the drug business, but not because they enjoy people suffering.  They want to cure it.
    • They don’t recommend cure-alls, or believe they even exist
    • They understand many people get small wages, so they don’t want them spending more than they have to, and when they’re sick and stop working they don’t get any wages.
    • To prevent missed work and the loss of pay, Rexall Olive Oil Emulsion is recommended.  It is a remedy for feeling word down, and prevents illness from taking hold
    • Rexall is a preventative medicine, it slowly builds up strength and health, is a real nerve food tonic, builds good blood, strong muscle, good digestion
    • Contains hypophosphites, which tone the nerves, and pure olive oil, which nourishes the nerves, blood, and entire system
    • Pleasant to take, no alcohol or habit-forming drugs
    • Satisfaction guaranteed or money back
    • Only available in this area at the DeFuniak Drug Co. for $1.00
  • Church Directory (1)
    • Listing of location, events and times for local churches
    • Methodist Church
      • C.S. Talley, pastor
    • Baptist Church
      • Rev. Sidney J. Catts, pastor
    • Presbyterian church
      • Rev. Lynn R. Walker, D.D., pastor
    • Universalist Church
      • Rev. Thomas Chapman, pastor
    • Episcopal Church
      • Rev. A.C.S. Smith, rector

The DeFuniak Herald – January 22, 1914 – Article excerpts

Contributed by Emily Petroskey

 

Article Excerpts

  • The Grand Jury (1)
    • Requests discharge after fulfilling duties at the winter term of the Circuit Court
    • Addressed to the Hon. J. Emmet Wolfe, Judge of the First Judicial Circuit Court of Florida in and for Walton County
    • Inspected public business matters in the Court House and County Jail: officers in the court house keep records and papers well-ordered, recommends a suitable vault be provided for the county tax collector to safeguard against fires; the county jail is in order and prisoners are well-kept
    • Poor farm inspected and in good condition, but $56 per month is insufficient to provide enough care for severe inmates, especially the invalids, recommends $10 per person per month, and with 7 inmates, they need $70 per month.  Some invalids need medical attention, two were kept together in a small room with a foul odor, and they should be separated.  Three additional comforts needed- 3 bed sheets, 3 pillow slips and 1 chamber should be provided by the Board of County Commissioners at once
    • Signed Allen L. Hart, Foreman, W.F. Hall, Clerk
  • Gary, Indiana Has A Unique School System (2)
    • School hours from 8-5 (longer than average public school)
    • Teaches plumbing, painting, tinsmithing, carpentry, wall papering, tool making, and cabinet making; and for girls classes taught in sewing, millinery, music, house decoration, washing and ironing, dishwashing, cooking, dressmaking, stenography, library work, etc.
    • Desks replaced with lockers, few text books because students learn by doing, regular physical examinations given
    • Reading, spelling, geometry and other typical academic subjects are taught by games
    • Children don’t skip class because they are interested in their work, it’s a combination of play and study
    • Girls and boys take practically the same courses and have the same advantages.
    • In the manual training department, everything is done for a practical purpose, i.e. the higher grade boys make furniture for use in the school and at home
    • William Wert, formerly of Blufftown, Indiana, is the Superintendent
  • In Memoriam (2)
    • Mrs. Melvina Banfil is recognized by the members of the Ladies Library Association for years of service and good works
    • She was a charter member of the association, served as both president and librarian, a mainstay of the association.
    • Her later years were clouded by loneliness and misunderstandings of failing intellect
    • The Association also mourns the loss of the Hon. Wallace Bruce, an honorary member and contributor to the collection
    • Mrs. N. Manning, President; Pearl E. Stanley, Secretary

The DeFuniak Herald – January 15, 1914 – Article excerpts

Contributed by Emily Petroskey

 

Article Excerpts

  • The W.O.W. Unveiling (1)
    • Monument to S.B. Padgette will be unveiled at Sandy Creek church, January 18, 1914 at 12:30
    • Submitted by Duncan Wilks, Clerk Camp No. 46, W.O.W. Ponce de Leon
  • Spring Term Circuit Court (1)
    • Circuit Court convened last Monday with Judge Wolfe and Solicitor Stokes
    • Attorneys and defendants attempted to delay with excuses of family illness, the death of a dog, and general unpreparedness until the judge lost his temper, then things progressed
    • Grand Jury: Allen Hart, J.B. Miller, C.R. Reddict, J.T. Jenkins, J.E. Thomas, J.B. Morrisot, S. Preacher, J.J. Thomasot, P.D. McDonald, W.F. Hall, W.J. Casson, E.V. Infinger, G.W. Harrison, J.D. Alford, Noah Adams, Willie Edge, John Hobbes, Allen Senterfitt
    • The editor served on the jury and apologizes for any delays in the Herald this week, full proceedings to follow next week
  • Commissioners (1)
    • County commissioners met last Monday, still in session at press time, business thus far as follows:
    • D.D. Collingsworth allowed a reduction on a lot in Glendale of $60
    • Citizens’ petition for a change in the road between Eucheanna and Knox Hill granted, overseer’s pay of $3 rescinded, will now receive $2.50/day for work on the road
    • $75/Month ordered to be paid to deputy assessors for not more than 2 months at a time
    • A.L. Anderson may change the DeFuniak and Portland road, moving it, as long as it doesn’t cost the county and the new road is in good condition
    • Petition for Oak Grove Road granted
    • New precinct, No. 23, created, with voting place in Argyle
    • All deputy registration officers to be paid 25¢ per name registered, when registration doesn’t exceed $4 that amount is allowed for services
    • Road overseers appointed, listed by district number
  1. D.C. Morrison & Jason Adkinson
  2. Amzie Pryor and W.R. Turner
  3. Not yet decided by Mr. Meigs
  4. J.W. McSwain & W.D. Locke
  5. John Pate and W. H. Taunton
  • $100 donation will be made to Thomas Industrial Institute
  • Creation of a new road ordered to intersect Red Bay and Eucheanna Rd
  • “Hub” Allen Dead (2)
    • D. Herbert Allen, president of the West Florida Press Association died last week in El Paso, TX, where he had travelled in hopes of improving his health
    • He once had been the publisher of the Milton Gazette
  • The First Gun (2)
    • Mr. L.H. Cawthon, “Uncle Hutch,” is a candidate for the office of Treasurer of Walton County, he is an old citizen, well known and a good, solid man
    • Miles Warren (young Miles) is also a candidate, has experience in the office of the Circuit Court
    • An inspector examined various buildings last week to find the best location for a new post office
  • Radium and Cancer (2)
    • Dr. Howard A. Kelley of Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore and Dr. Robert Abbe of NY are conducting clinical experiments to test the effects of radium as a curative agent in superficial cases of cancerous tumors
    • Providence, RI Journal reports mixed results
    • New York Globe comments on the high market value of radium and U.S. dependence on European labs, suggests the Wilson administration should withdraw all lands of the public domain believed to contain radium-bearing ore for the people’s good, making radium available to all who need it
    • “The use of radium in the field of medicine is only in it’s infancy, and no man can foresee it’s possibilities”
    • Miami Metropolis Article
  • Miss Campbell Entertains (2)
    • Saturday evening Miss Lane Campbell hosted a 6:00 dinner party, pink & white color scheme, 5 courses served
    • Guest list included: Christian & Flora Gillis, Catherine Walker, Marguerite Sowell, Kate McSween, Ruth Wyle, Mr. Hall Richardson, Mr. Ralph Campbell, Mr. Arthur Noble, Mr. Malcom Morrison
  • At the Universalist Church (2)
    • Rev. Thomas Chapman will preach on Sunday morning on “Sin Against the Holy Spirit” and “Eternal Life” in the evening
  • Small Blaze (2)
    • Dr. Simmons’ woodshed caught on fire last Tuesday afternoon called out fire department and caused lots of excitement, but only the woodshed was damaged
  • How To Make War
    • War is evil, full of atrocities against everyone including women and children
    • Huerta of Mexico sent a force into the northern states of Mexico with orders to destroy and devastate in order to deprive his enemies of the means to support a war against him.
    • Should the US intervene? “Huerta may be a tyrant but he is president of Mexico til he can be put down,” let Mexico sort itself out, according to the Times-Union
  • From Everywhere (3)
    • DeFuniak has a large population of people not originally from the area
    • At the Bible class social last Thursday evening, those present were from: Alabama- 7, Ohio- 6, Illinois- 4, South Dakota- 2, Florida- 2, Mississippi- 1, Wisconsin- 1, West Virginia- 1, Michigan- 1
    • The 1 Floridians present were children born in DeFuniak of northern parents
  • Sentiment & Science (3)
    • Discussion of Euthanasia, the physician’s right to provide a painless death to relieve the suffering of an incurable disease, at the patient’s request
    • Justifying it would mean that the doctor declaring someone incurable has to know absolutely everything in the world about medicine, and discoveries are constantly being made, so a disease that is incurable could soon be made curable if the patient lives long enough
    • Times-Union article
  • Palmer College (3)
    • The college has two literary societies
    • One meets in the society hall in the sought wing of the boy’s dormitory, is called the Amelian
    • Mr. Ralph Campbell is president, the Amelian meets every other Saturday night at 7:00
    • The goal is to bring all students closer together socially and to instruct and aid them in overcoming stage fright
  • The Age of Belief (5)
    • Skeptics and Agnostics used to be respected and listened to, especially the skilled orators for the questions and discussions they could evoke
    • Outspoken critics have disappeared, criticism of Christianity has become unpopular and a sign of poor intelligence
    • The Bible is read amongst a wider audience and Christian teachings are more practical and applicable, this is an age of belief
    • Miami Metropolis Article
  • Union Service (5)
    • High attendance at Union services at the Methodist Church last Sunday
    • Speakers: Rev. Mr. Tally, Rev. J.J. Catts of the Baptist Church, Dr. L.R. Walker of the Presbyterian church, and Rev. D.F. Ellisor of Alabama
    • Humorous comparison of Catts and Tally to “Jeff and Mutt”
  • Palmer College (5)
    • Winter term begins Tuesday at 8:30
    • Principal Mr. Kemper has fully recovered from the illness that incapacitated him during the whole fall term
    • New set of pianos for music students
    • Miss Jordan expected to have student recitals soon, a possible faculty recital may be put on for the public around February 1st
    • Two new tennis courts built under the direction of Mr. H.L. Painter, there may be a tennis tournament in the spring
    • New department of expression and physical culture added this year, well-received
  • Poem by Berton Brales (5)
    • “If” – After Kipling – A Long Way After

The DeFuniak Herald – January 8, 1914 – Article excerpts

Contributed by Emily Petroskey

 

Article Excerpts

  • A Tribute From A Friend (1)
    • A poem written for the recently deceased Hon. Wallace Bruce
    • By S.M. Terry
  • Hon. Wallace Bruce (1)
    • Extended Obituary/Biography for Wallace Bruce
    • Never recovered from a stroke of paralysis
    • Died January 2 at home on Wright Ave
    • Funeral held Sunday January 4 at 2 PM in Chautauqua auditorium, lay in state from 12-2
    • Service conducted by Rev. A.C.S. Smyth, Rector of Episcopal Church, Eulogy given by Rev. R.Q. Baker, Emma Dawdy Sesoms of Bonifay sang “My Ain Countrie,” Union Choir sang, prayer by Dr. Lynn Walker, then interment at the city cemetery
  • A Case of “Grip” (2)
    • The editor is sick
  • Occupations That Cure (2)
    • Consumption is rare in tanneries
    • Shepherds are very healthy, doctors suggest strong odor of sheep has antiseptic quality
    • Men working at gasworks are generally free of diseases of throat and chest, especially whooping cough and influenza
    • Copper miners never had typhoid
    • The atmosphere of turpentine factories cures/prevents rheumatism
    • Preparing/Selling lavender cures neuralgia, headaches, nervous breakdowns, anemia
    • Smell of printer’s ink prevents consumption and yellow fever
  • The Play (2)
    • The play, “Miss Busby’s Borders,” will begin at 8 o’clock
  • Class Social (2)
    • Bible Class of the Methodist Sunday school will have a social meeting tonight in the basement of the church, all members invited
  • Local Blurbs (2)
    • John M.C. Stocton is cutting a considerable swath over in East Florida and stranger things than his election may happen
    • Pay poll taxes and register, anticipating a “pretty hot little political scrap this year”
    • Expecting a new candidate for county offices
    • Vol. 1 No. 1 of Malone Messenger ahs been printed by editor John Harris, positive review given
    • Mrs. Laggett of the Pensacola Journal’s Circulation department visited the city and reports that the Journal’s subscription here is growing nicely
    • More tramp printers exist now than have been seen since 1898, avoid P. & A.
    • Section on Frank Mayes’ campaign for governor.
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