Posts Tagged ‘Morrison’

The DeFuniak Herald – February 5, 1914 – Page 3

Local News Items: Social and Personal Notes of Local Interest

  • Rev. D. F. Slaughter of Ozark, Ala., was in the city Monday shaking hands with old friends who are always glad to see his genial face.
  • Mrs. Ceal and son, of Birmingham, Ala., who have been here visiting her sister, Mrs. Geo. Davis, left for Jacksonville last Sunday night.
  • Mr. D. E. Richardson returned from Jacksonville last Friday where he had been to attend the Re Union.
  • Mrs. J. C. Walden Sr. was over from Andalusia, Ala., the first of the week to visit home folks.
  • Mrs. Dear left for Miss. last Friday. Mrs. Dear has a host of friends here who hope to see her again soon.
  • Mr. Wm. L. Campbell, of Bruce, was in the city the first of the week.
  • Mr. Pink Ward, of Red Bay, is in the city this week, much to the joy of his many friends here.
  • Mr. Patterson of Atmore, Ala., who has been here visiting his sister, Mrs. Kenneth Bruce, returned to his home last Sunday.
  • Mrs. Lancelot Hughes and daughter, who have been here visiting her parents, Dr. and Mrs. G. P. Morris, left for their home in Ponce de Leon last Friday.
  • Mrs. Seyfrit who has been here visiting her daughter, Mrs. Geo Davis, left for Bonifay last Tuesday.
  • Mr. J. C. Ward, of Union, was in our city last Friday on business.
  • Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Davis and daughter of Deerland were in our city last Saturday visiting friends.
  • Mr. J. M. Wilson and family attended preaching at Gum Creek last Sunday.
  • Rev. and Mrs. Buttrum of Freeport passed through our city last Friday enroute home after a visit to various cities in the county.
  • Miss Ruby Cawthon and brother Mr. Lewis visited Gum Creek last Sunday.
  • Mr. Amos Lewis of Marianna was in the city the first of the week.
  • Mr. Frank attended church at Gum Creek last Sunday.
  • Mr. Walker Green of Argyle was in our city last Friday and made a pleasant call at the Herald Office.
  • Dr. G. P. Morris returned from Carrabelle last Thursday night after spending a few days with friends.
  • Mrs. Obie Adams and daughter visited relatives at Freeport last Sunday.
  • Mrs. T. N. Townsend and children who have been here visiting Dr. E. L. Townsend and family left for their home at Carrabelle last Saturday.
  • Rev. P. M. Scott of Ponce de Leon was in our city last Saturday.
  • Miss Martha Morrison [of] Euchee Valley was in town last Saturday visiting friends and relatives.
  • Mr. D. H. King and mother Mrs. M. King attended preaching at Gum Creek last Sunday.
  • Mr. J.E. Clark of Mossy Head was in town on business last Saturday.
  • Mrs. J.C. Walden Sr. visited her sister Mrs. McLean at Freeport last Friday and Saturday.
  • Mr. and Mrs. L. I. Langley of Alaqua were in town last Saturday.
  • J. C. Walden Jr. visited relatives at Freeport last Saturday.
  • John Fountain of Lakewood was in town last Tuesday.
  • Mrs. Lowell, of Pensacola, arrived last Sunday to visit her friend, Mrs. M. A. Cawthon, [for] a few days.
  • Mr. Frank McLean of Pensacola arrived last night to visit his niece, Mrs. W. K. Jennings.
  • Mrs. Ratclift left last Friday for her home in Gloster, Miss.
  • Dr. C. Thompson received the sad news of the death of his sister, Mrs. Rose Albee, at St. Thomas, Ontario, last Thursday morning.
  • The W. C. T. U. will meet next Tuesday afternoon at 4 o’clock at the home of Mrs. Robert Buchanan.
  • Mr. H. Jernigan, of Portland, is in town visiting his daughter, Mr. Geo. Ward.
  • Dr. Mitchell left last night for Panama City on business.
  • Mrs. Claude Meigs visited friends at Ponce de Leon last Tuesday.
  • Mr. G. W. Parish of Niceville was in town yesterday to visit relatives.
  • Miss Anna Parish left last night for Lucedale, Miss., to attend the graduating exercises of her niece, Miss Hazel Jones.
  • Mrs. Ellen Ames of Texas arrived last Sunday to visit her friend, Mrs. M. A. Cawthon.
  • Mr. D. C. Campbell of Jacksonville was in our city yesterday to visit his father Dr. D. L. Campbell.
  • Mr. Bowers Campbell and family have rented Mrs. Sprague Cottage on the Circle and expect to move in as soon as some repairing is done.
  • By order of the Chancellor Commander of the Felton Lodge K. of P. [Knights of Pythias] there will be a special meeting Monday night the 18th to confer ranks. All members are earnestly requested to be present at this meeting.
  • Dr. S. E. Stephens of Mossy Head was in town on business  Tuesday.
  • Mr. Dave Adams, of Paxton, was in our city the first of the week on business.
  • Mr. J. J. Meigs of Mossy Head visited our city on business Monday.
  • Messrs. R. E. L. Jones, D. Jones and John Cortney of Ealum were in town the first of the week.
  • Mr. Geo. Keene of Mossy Head was in town last Monday.
  • Messrs. Bud Adams and Allen Jones of Ealum were in town the first of the week.
  • Mr. Oscar Helms of Mossy Head was in town Tuesday.
  • Mr. H. E. Wickersham and family visited relatives at Knox Hill Sunday afternoon.
  • Mr. Norman Gillis of Knox Hill was in town the first of the week.
  • Mrs. A. D. Douglass and son Curry of Pleasant Ridge were in town Wednesday.
  • Mr. Chas. McIver, of Bruce, was in our city the first of the week.
  • Messrs. J. N. Boothe and W. D. McCallum of Dorcas were in our city last Tuesday.
  • Mrs. Miller and son Arthur of Bonifay visited relatives here Monday.
  • D. G. Ray and Alvin Gillis visited friends at Westville last Sunday
  • Mr. R. P. Winslett visited Bonifay, Caryville and Westville looking after Telephone business last Saturday.
  • Mesdames Chas. and Harvey Turner and son visited relatives at Mossy Head last Thursday.
  • Mrs. Jim Brigman of Westville returned to her home Wednesday after spending several days with her sister, Mrs. T. J. Miller.

[Compiled by Emily Petroskey]

The DeFuniak Herald – March 26, 1914

Mrs Jennie McLeod died Sunday at the home of her son-in-law-law D.D. Douglas, with whom she has lived for many years. She was 81 years old. Three grandchildren survive Clyde, Jennie, and Angus Douglas. Two brothers Judge Daniel Campbell and Mr John A. Campbell, a sister Mrs C. Harrison of Milton.  Having descended from the Campbells and Morrisons, prominent families of Walton county. The remains will be buried in Euchee Valley cemetery.

[Contributed by Rita Bridges]

The Breeze – November 23, 1911 – Pages 1 & 4

ARCHBISHOP FUNERAL (p. 1)
(ARCADIA) H. H. Stewart, John A. Morrison and son, Campbell, were the people from here that attended the funeral ceremonies of the late Archbishop at Sandy Creek on Sunday.
(RED BAY) W. H. Kennington attended the Masonic ceremonies over the grave of the Archbishop at Sandy Creek on Sunday.

 

FUNERAL ATTENDEES (p. 4)
(LOCALS) Judge and Mrs. Parish, Thad Bell (the Walton County Sheriff at the time) and John Meigs were among those from town who went out to Sandy Creek, Sunday to attend the Masonic funeral ceremonies over the grave of the late Archbishop, who died last week from the effects of the cancer from which he suffered so long.
 

Contributed by Michael Strickland

The Breeze – July 13, 1911 – Page 10

PROGRAM

of the Fifth Sunday Meeting to Convene with Alice Creek Church, July 29th.
Meeting called to order by the Moderator at 10:20 a. m.
Sermon by Rev. Sidney J. Catts. Recess one hour for refreshments.
Meeting called to order by the Moderator. Permanent organization to be effected from one to one-thirty.
Lecture on orphan’s home and its results, 30 minutes by J. D. Alford and D. T.Arrant.
2 p. m. Lecture on Home Missions by J. E. West and S. J. Catts, 30 minutes.
Committee will arrange for services at 7:30 p. m.
Sunday, July 30th.
Meeting called to order at 9 a. m., by the Moderator.
Lecture on “Which is the true church, by D. Anderson 30 minutes.
9:30 to 10 a. m., Lecture on Sunday School and its effect by J. R. Anderson and U. C. Vinson. Recess ten minutes.
Sermon at 11 a. m., by Rev. D. Anderson. Recess one hour for refreshments.
at 1:30 lecture on Foreign Missions by J. R. Anderson and D. T. Arrant.
At 2 p. m., lecture on good behavior and its effect on society by Bros. Arrant, Morrison and D. Anderson. Recess 10 minutes.
Sermon at 3 p. m., by J. D. Hattaway.
Respectfully submitted,
Perry A. Jones
Insel Spence.
W. C. Cook.
Committee

[Contributed by Michael Strickland]

The Breeze – June 29, 1911 – Page 1

Pretty Wedding at the Methodist Church, Tuesday Night

Amid pretty decorations of pink and green and witnessed by a large number of friends and relatives Rev. D. P. Slaughter of the Methodist church read the beautiful ceremony that united in holy wedlock Malcolm Bruce and Florence Olive, only daughter of Mrs. Florence Rogers at the Methodist church Monday night at half past seven.

Brides are proverbially beautiful but softened lights under shades of pink never shown on a fairer one than this dear girl who has grown up from early childhood in DeFuniak, and loved by every one who knew her. Her husband may well be proud of the prize he has won, and he comes as near being worthy of her as man ever gets to be.

Mrs. Henry Rogers was matron of honor and the bridesmaids were Misses Effie Stubbs, Ruth Thalimer and Eliza Berry, the best man being the brides brother, Rudolph and the other attendants Waverly Wadsworth, Malcolm Morrison, and G. D. Campbell.

The bride entered on the arm of her cousin, H. J. Rogers who gave her at the altar to the man of her choice.

Mr. and Mrs. Bruce left on the night train, for New York where they will spend the summer, quietly slipping away to Argyle to embark leaving the rice and old slippers at the depot in the hands of the badly sold crowd that gathered to see them off.

Bon voyage on your wedding trip, friends of ours, and all through life.

[Contributed by Michael Strickland]

The Breeze – February 23, 1911 – Page 2

A Pretty Wedding Last Wednesday Night [February 15, 1911]

DeFuniak weddings are always pretty, and to say that one is prettier than an other, is hard to do and tell the truth, but that of Miss Gussie McCaskill and William Olin Campbell which was solemnized at the Presbyterian church last Wednesday night, was at least one of the prettiest, and handsome decorations, brilliant illuminations, the large crowd of relatives and guests altogether made it an occasion long to be remembered.

An organ prelude by Mrs. Ecker announced the coming of the bridal party, and this was followed by a solo by Miss Lucile Jordan, and the party entered to the strains of Mendelshon’s wedding march, led by the ushers, Walter McLeod, W. Ide Stinson, W. D. C. Campbell and Gillis Douglass, the groomsmen being H. L. Cawthon, Dudley McCaskill and J. L. McKinnon Jr., while the bridesmaids were Misses Annie Campbell, Mary Campbell, Erma Ecker, the maid of honor was Miss Marie Lewis and the best man J. H. Morrison.

The pretty little flower girls were Mary Hope Cawthon and Emma Belle McKinnon while little Angeline McCaskill bore the ring on a dainty satin cushion.

The charming bride attractively gowned in brocaded satin trimmed in lace and pearls, with veil caught with orange blossoms and carried a shower bouquet of white roses, entered on the arm of her father and was met at the altar where the ceremony was impressively performed by Rev. Lynn R. Walker, the pastor.

The happy pair left on the evening train for a trip to New Orleans and on their return will occupy a cozy cottage on the east side of the lake.

[Contributed by Michael Strickland]

The Breeze – August 4, 1910 – Pages 1 and 8

. . . in a short while Bunk was in custody, but kept away from Tom Johnson, the first arrested, and told that Tom was dead, but that before his execution he had told that Bunk was the guilty party. He [Bunk] then made a partial confession and implicated Tom. Finally by adroit questioning it was made certain that both these were concerned in the crime and that there was another . . . engaged in its commission with them. He was soon located and with this confessions in part were obtained from all of them, and they were brought together, and face to face with the fate they knew awaited them told the awful and unprintable details of the most atrocious crime ever committed in Florida.

. . . the crowd . . . of over a thousand men . . . made the [guilty ones to] kneel and a volley of shots literally tore their bodies to pieces, and it was over. . . It was only with the greatest difficulty that the [neighbors] in that section could be induced to take up the bodies of the murderers of little Bessie Morrison from where they were shot and given burial, but they were finally persuaded to do so.

[Contributed by Michael Strickland]

The Breeze – August 4, 1910 – Page 1

Assaulted and murdered . . . was the awful fate of little Bessie May Morrison . . . within half a mile of her widowed mother’s home, while on her way to school at Leonia school house in northwestern part of Holmes county, last Friday [July 29, 1910]. . . . The body of the victim was laid to rest in the Leonia cemetery Sunday afternoon.

[Contributed by Michael Strickland]

The Breeze – June 9, 1910 – Page 3

Neil Morrison says he is going to take lessons in Russian to be able to properly express his opinion of cheap gasoline engines. He claims to have exhausted the English vocabulary without appreciable effect.

[Contributed by Michael Strickland]

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