Posts Tagged ‘Oranges’

The Breeze – December 14, 1911 – Pages 1, 2, 4, 5, & 6

GENERAL NEWS

 

 

OAK RIDGE NEAR BEAR HEAD (p. 1)
(DEERLAND) Rev. W. G. Miller passed through Saturday night going to Oak Ridge near Bear Head to preach Sunday.

WALKED SIX MILES (p. 1)
(DORCAS) Yes, they say he actually walked six miles to meet a man who was to give him a ride in an auto back home, but alas, the fellow didn’t come, then he thought of the horse in the lot back home, but there was nothing to do but the retrace his steps. “Poor litte Joe,” makes me sorry for him.

INVITATIONS TO WORK THE ROAD (p. 1)
(DORCAS) The Dorcas boys between the ages of 21 and 45 have invitations to work the road this week.

LETTERS FOR SANTA CLAUS (p. 2)

  • I want a bugle and a train. From Bud to Santa Claus.
  • DeFuniak Springs, Fla., Dear Santa Claus: I want a sleeping doll and a doll carriage. From Viola Lock to Santa Claus.
  • Freeport, Fla. Dear Santa Claus: Please bring me a doll and a locket and some fruit and candy. Your little friend, Clyde Miller
  • Argyle, Fla. Dear Santa Claus: I want you to bring me an air ship and lots of good things to eat. I do think you are a good old man. Aubry Ward
  • DeFuniak Springs, Fla. Dear Santa Culaus: I am going to tell you what I want. I want a big doll and story book and a doll bed. So bye bye, Marie Hattaway.
  • Freeport, Fla. Dear Santa Claus: I want you to bring me a doll and a doll carriage and bed, and please bring me a bracelet. Your Little Friend Alpha Mae Miller.
  • Glendale, Fla. Dear Santa Claus: I write you a letter to tell you what I want for Christmas. I would like some firecrackers and a bugle. Yours Truly, Master Norman Murphy.
  • DeFuniak Springs, Fla., Dear Santa Claus: I will tell you what I want you to bring me. I want a sleeping doll and a doll carriage, Yours Truly, Evia Lock.
  • Freeport, Fla. Dear Santa Claus: I want you to bring me a wagon and a cap and an overcoat, and please bring me a gun and a hoe and a rake. Your Little Friend, John Eben Miller.
  • Dear Santa Claus: I am eight old and have been good as I could. Please bring me a bicycle and a watch and plenty of fruit, and don’t forget the baby. Yours in hopes, Walter Straughn.
  • Freeport, Fla. Dear Santa Clasu: I want you to bring me a wagon and a horn and a cap and an overcoat and a little gu, and please bring me a little hoe and rake. Your Little Friend, Charles Hilton Miller.
  • Dear Old Santa Claus: I hope will come and fill my stocking this year. I would like for you to bring me a doll carriage, doll house, doll trunk, doll tea-set, doll bed or caradel and a stove to go with it. Your Loving Friend, Gladys Storrs.
  • Argyle, Fla. Dear Santa Claus: I want you to bring me a doll piano and a tea set and a lot of good things to eat, and don’t forget that I have got two little sister and bring them something prety to. Your Little Friend, Alma Ward.
  • DeFunak Springs, Fla. Dear Santa Claus: I found your letter in the Breeze and am very glad to answer it. I will tell you what I want. I want a big sleeping doll and a doll carriage, a story book and a doll bed. Yours Truly, Ada Lock.
  • Dear Santa Claus: I hope your will come around this way Christmas. I would like you to bring me a doll carriage, doll cradle, doll tea set, doll stove, and dishes to go with it, trunk and a key and a tray for it, also a basketball and a doll house. Your Little Friend, Iris Storrs.
  • Union Fla. Dearest Santa: I want you to bring me a bracelet and a box of chocolates and some chewing gum too, and bring me a little doll suit case and now Santa do not think this is to much for you to bring. Be sure to come, Your Little Friend, Vella Neel.
  • Dear Santa Claus: Please bring me a ricycle and a top and some nuts and some candy, and a little toy automobile. Thank you for the things you brought me last Christmas. your fiiend, Herbert Powell.
  • DeFuniak Springs, Fla. Dear Santa Claus: I am so glad you are coming again. Bring me some fire crackers and some roman candles and a little gun and a horse and wagon and all kinds of ruit. I wish you a merry Christmas. Your friend, Clifford Turnipseed.
  • DeFuniak Springs, Fla. Dear Santa Claus: I am so glad Christmas has come again and that you are going to pay us a visit and bring us so many toys. Bring me a little train and a big Teddy bear, a little gun and all kinds of fire works and candy and fruits. I have a little sister, bring something too, and bring me a rocking horse. Wishing you a merry Christmas, Your little friend, Harley Turnipseed.

MOSSY BEND ITEM (p. 4)
Talk about cane from the Mossy Bend country, but you should see that raised by John McRea a mile from town. A comparison of that and Dr. McKinnon’s sample does not show so very much difference.

ICE PLANT ITEM (p. 5)
The pipe for the artesian well at the ice plant arrived last week.

CHUFAS (p. 5)
W. D. Jones has gathered 225 bushels of chufas from his five acres. He sells these to the seed houses and if you do not think there is any money in them try to buy some for seed. He cleaned them last week at the rate of over a peck in five minutes, and if you don’t believe that is working some, try it.

ORANGES AND SATSUMAS (p. 5)
That sweet oranges as well as the Satsumas will thrive here has been demonstrated by Phil Fellows who left us some samples last week from a treeon his place from which he gathered several hundred this year. The tree was a seedling which came up from the root of a Satsuma which froze down some hears ago when it got so awful cold.

HOW TO KEEP BUTTER COOL. (p. 6)
A convenient and easy way to keep butter cool is by applying the principle of cooling by evaporation, as used in the wet bulb of the wet and dry bulb hygrometer. The butter is placed in a closed receptacle (butter dish with lid), and after this has been placed in a soup plate containing water a wet cloth is put over the dish with its ends in the water. Evaporation goes on at the surface of the cloth, and more water is supplied to the cloth from the place below. This keeps the cloth and dish inside at a few degrees below the atmospheric temperature, and by this means butter can be kept firm in the hottest days.

HOW TO CURE HAMS (p. 6)
My method of curing hams is as follows: Trim them neatly and make a brine strong enough to float afresh egg. Put themin this and let them remain four or five days to draw out all the blood. Then take them out and boil and skim the brine and when cold return them to the brine, adding enough fresh brine to cover them, and then add for each 100 pounds of ham a pint of black mollasses and an ounce of salt petre, and let the hams remain in the brine for two or three weeks. Then take them out and hang and smoke well with hickory wood or corn cobs and smother the fire with green cedar brush. When well smoked, take them down and paint them all over with a thick mixture of black molasses and black pepper. Wrap in stout brown paper and put each in a cotton sack and dip it in lime wash and hang in a dark smoke house. The hams will improve till a year old.
I treat shoulders in the same way, and sides, except that the sides remain in brine half the time that the hams do. Jowls treated in this way are fine for boinling with turnip greens in the spring. –W. F. Massey, in the Progressive Farmer

 

Contributed by Michael Strickland

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