The Breeze – October 5, 1911 – Pages 1, 4, & 5

GENERAL NEWS

 

 

NEW WELL (p. 1)
(RED BAY) N. A. McLeod has had a well dug at his home the past week.

 

A VERY NARROW ESCAPE. (p.1)
Little Lillian Murray Run Over By An Auto.
One of the narrowest escapes from instant death to get off with only a few severe bruises was the lot that befell little Lillian Murray last Saturday morning(Oct 31, 1911), when the bicycle she was riding collided with an auto drive by Dr. Raborn, at the corner of Live Oak and the Circle.From the statement of eye-witnesses it seems that she started to turn out on one side, and became frightened and turned back the other way, and in spite of the efforts of Dr. Raborn to stop the car it struck her in such a way as to throw her directly under it, and it passed over her, the wheels narrowly missing her head. Hope Cawthon and Bowers Campbell who saw the accident, ran to her and pulled her from beneath the rear axle, expecting nothing else than that she was killed, but aside from some severe bruises on her shoulder and scratches on her face she was uninjured. She was hurried to a physician immediately, who after an examination said there were no serious injuries. It seems to have been one of those unavoidable accidents where nobody was to blame, but it should be a warning to auto drivers of the necessity of being more careful than the majority are in driving around town.

 

INVENTED BY FLORIDIAN (p. 4)
Nearly every automobile owner has read with interest the advertisements in the automobile journals and big magazines the advertisements of the “Silent Knight” motor, but how many of them know that this motor is the product of the inventive mind of a Floridian, who tried and tried to get American manufacturers to adopt his invention, but could not, and went to Europe with it where it met with a ready reception, and now this stone which the builders rejected is become the head of the corner of the automobile industry.

A COMPROMISE SUGGESTED (p. 4)
Hon. W. A. Blount was here last week for the purpose of taking testimony in the injunction suit to prevent the payment of the warrents issued in payment for Chipley Park. Col. Flournoy as the attorney for the parties bringing the suit suggested that if the original proposition made by the town would be accepted that the suit would be dropped and after consultation with the local officials of the Chautauqua Association, the matter of taking the testimony was deferred until the return of Mr. Bruce.
If the proposition is accepted the town will pay the $2,000 and take the Park, and the Association retain the tabernacle and the church and library remain as they are.

PALMER COLLEGE ENROLLMENT (p. 5)
An enrollment of 105 wasn’t a bad start for Palmer College, now was it?

WALTON HIGH SCHOOL ITEM (p. 5)
Principal Rogers had the school building thoroughly cleaned up last week and placed in shape for the opening of school Monday, doing much of the necessary repair work himself.

MURPHY’S CROP ROTATION (p. 5)
Wm. Murphy was down from Glendale, Tuesday, and tells us that he has a crop rotation plan that virtually gives him forty acres of crop per annum on 16 acres of land, but there is no where else in the world except West Florida in which it would work. He has promised to write it out in detail for the benefit of the Breeze readers.

 

Contributed by Michael Strickland

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