The DeFuniak Herald – February 5, 1914 – Page 2

Red Bay

  • Clifford Meigs, of DeFuniak and Randall Hughes of Ponce de Leon were down here Sunday.
  • Mrs. Neil McLeod visited her mother, Mrs. David George, at the Valley Sunday.
  • Mr. and Mrs. Pat Kennington of Ponce de Leon spent Sunday with their parents.
  • Miss Irene Brown spent last week at home.
  • Rev. Peacock of Pleasant Valley preached here Sunday.
  • J.R. Brown and Marshall Chamberlain were in DeFuniak last week.
  • Daniel Alec McDonald and Reg Sanford were in Ponce de Leon on business Wednesday.
  • Edgar Chamberlain was in Argyle Sunday.
  • Tom Chamberlain wears a smile these days twice as long and large as the ordinary father wears. His twins are named Hurtis and Curtis.
  • The young people under the management of Mrs. Brown and Mrs. McLeod are practicing for a play to be given in about two weeks. It is to be given to raise funds with which to purchase a new fence to be used around the cemetery. A worthy object, and we are sure the young folks will receive the encouragement and patronage they deserve.

[Compiled by Emily Petroskey]

The DeFuniak Herald – March 11, 1943

Norman McLeod, son of the late Captain William McLeod passed away Wednesday March 10th in St Petersburg Florida.  He is survived by 2 brothers John & Walter, 2 sisters Misses Kate and Sarah Ellen of St Petersburg. Services were held Saturday in Wickersham‘s Chapel, internment was at Magnolia.

[Contributed by Lois Danley and Sharon Watson]

The DeFuniak Herald – March 26, 1914

Mrs Jennie McLeod died Sunday at the home of her son-in-law-law D.D. Douglas, with whom she has lived for many years. She was 81 years old. Three grandchildren survive Clyde, Jennie, and Angus Douglas. Two brothers Judge Daniel Campbell and Mr John A. Campbell, a sister Mrs C. Harrison of Milton.  Having descended from the Campbells and Morrisons, prominent families of Walton county. The remains will be buried in Euchee Valley cemetery.

[Contributed by Rita Bridges]

The Breeze – October 5, 1911 – Pages 1, 4, & 5

GENERAL NEWS

 

 

NEW WELL (p. 1)
(RED BAY) N. A. McLeod has had a well dug at his home the past week.

 

A VERY NARROW ESCAPE. (p.1)
Little Lillian Murray Run Over By An Auto.
One of the narrowest escapes from instant death to get off with only a few severe bruises was the lot that befell little Lillian Murray last Saturday morning(Oct 31, 1911), when the bicycle she was riding collided with an auto drive by Dr. Raborn, at the corner of Live Oak and the Circle.From the statement of eye-witnesses it seems that she started to turn out on one side, and became frightened and turned back the other way, and in spite of the efforts of Dr. Raborn to stop the car it struck her in such a way as to throw her directly under it, and it passed over her, the wheels narrowly missing her head. Hope Cawthon and Bowers Campbell who saw the accident, ran to her and pulled her from beneath the rear axle, expecting nothing else than that she was killed, but aside from some severe bruises on her shoulder and scratches on her face she was uninjured. She was hurried to a physician immediately, who after an examination said there were no serious injuries. It seems to have been one of those unavoidable accidents where nobody was to blame, but it should be a warning to auto drivers of the necessity of being more careful than the majority are in driving around town.

 

INVENTED BY FLORIDIAN (p. 4)
Nearly every automobile owner has read with interest the advertisements in the automobile journals and big magazines the advertisements of the “Silent Knight” motor, but how many of them know that this motor is the product of the inventive mind of a Floridian, who tried and tried to get American manufacturers to adopt his invention, but could not, and went to Europe with it where it met with a ready reception, and now this stone which the builders rejected is become the head of the corner of the automobile industry.

A COMPROMISE SUGGESTED (p. 4)
Hon. W. A. Blount was here last week for the purpose of taking testimony in the injunction suit to prevent the payment of the warrents issued in payment for Chipley Park. Col. Flournoy as the attorney for the parties bringing the suit suggested that if the original proposition made by the town would be accepted that the suit would be dropped and after consultation with the local officials of the Chautauqua Association, the matter of taking the testimony was deferred until the return of Mr. Bruce.
If the proposition is accepted the town will pay the $2,000 and take the Park, and the Association retain the tabernacle and the church and library remain as they are.

PALMER COLLEGE ENROLLMENT (p. 5)
An enrollment of 105 wasn’t a bad start for Palmer College, now was it?

WALTON HIGH SCHOOL ITEM (p. 5)
Principal Rogers had the school building thoroughly cleaned up last week and placed in shape for the opening of school Monday, doing much of the necessary repair work himself.

MURPHY’S CROP ROTATION (p. 5)
Wm. Murphy was down from Glendale, Tuesday, and tells us that he has a crop rotation plan that virtually gives him forty acres of crop per annum on 16 acres of land, but there is no where else in the world except West Florida in which it would work. He has promised to write it out in detail for the benefit of the Breeze readers.

 

Contributed by Michael Strickland

The Breeze – July 13, 1911 – Page 8

In Memoriam.

Excerpt from the minutes of Camp E. Kirby Smith, July 1st, 1911:

The following was reported and adopted:

“By the death of our Commandant, William B. McLeod, June 29, 1911, a man of sterling character, a good soldier in times “that tried men’s souls” and a patriotic citizen of the reunited country was removed from the scene of earthly activities.

Espousing a cause that had the sanction of his head and detion of his heart, he volunteered in the Confederate service as a member of Company E, 1st Fla., regiment.

He was wounded on the hotly contested field of Chicamauga in 1863 and the next year lost an arm by a cannon ball in the fighting around Atlanta.

He enlisted as a soldier of the cross also. Was a ruling elder in Freeport church and after his removal to De Funiak, was chosen for the same position in the church there.

When at last the point of exhaustion was reached and the flag he loved was lowered to overwhelming numbers, he was saddened indeed, but not unmanned. Having made an honorable record in war, he now exemplifies good citizenship in peace. Substituting the implements of industry for the weapons of war he became a factor in the up building of his beloved South. He was often entrusted with positions of responsibility in his county. He was twice tax assessor, once collector and served on the boards of Public Instruction and County commissioners.

His record is made and has won wide approval.

Our ranks are already thin, and are thinning more and more rapidly as the sun of our earthly lives hastens to its setting. But if only we, soldiers of the Confederacy, enlist under the Banner of the Crost of the Captain of Salvation will lead us to assured victory, and in lieu of the Cypress we shall one day wave the Palm.

Resolved, First; That the death of Captain McLeod entails a loss to our camp, to the community and to his family.

Second; that we tender our condolence to the family and order that a page be inscribed to his memory.

Third; that this memorial be published in the local papers and that a copy be sent to the family of our deceased comrade.

Respectfully submitted: R. Q. Baker, W. C. McLean, J. C. Douglass, W. D. McLean, W. A. Winslett. Committee.

[Contributed by Michael Strickland]

The Breeze – February 23, 1911 – Page 2

A Pretty Wedding Last Wednesday Night [February 15, 1911]

DeFuniak weddings are always pretty, and to say that one is prettier than an other, is hard to do and tell the truth, but that of Miss Gussie McCaskill and William Olin Campbell which was solemnized at the Presbyterian church last Wednesday night, was at least one of the prettiest, and handsome decorations, brilliant illuminations, the large crowd of relatives and guests altogether made it an occasion long to be remembered.

An organ prelude by Mrs. Ecker announced the coming of the bridal party, and this was followed by a solo by Miss Lucile Jordan, and the party entered to the strains of Mendelshon’s wedding march, led by the ushers, Walter McLeod, W. Ide Stinson, W. D. C. Campbell and Gillis Douglass, the groomsmen being H. L. Cawthon, Dudley McCaskill and J. L. McKinnon Jr., while the bridesmaids were Misses Annie Campbell, Mary Campbell, Erma Ecker, the maid of honor was Miss Marie Lewis and the best man J. H. Morrison.

The pretty little flower girls were Mary Hope Cawthon and Emma Belle McKinnon while little Angeline McCaskill bore the ring on a dainty satin cushion.

The charming bride attractively gowned in brocaded satin trimmed in lace and pearls, with veil caught with orange blossoms and carried a shower bouquet of white roses, entered on the arm of her father and was met at the altar where the ceremony was impressively performed by Rev. Lynn R. Walker, the pastor.

The happy pair left on the evening train for a trip to New Orleans and on their return will occupy a cozy cottage on the east side of the lake.

[Contributed by Michael Strickland]