The Breeze – August 31, 1911 – Page 5

Green Williams dies suddenly.

The community was shocked yesterday morning by the announcement of the sudden death of Green Williams, who fell from the window of his mother’s residence on 12th St. while suffering from a hemorrage. He had evidently had one attack during the night, and early this morning had another and went to the window, and his mother who was in the yard saw him fall, but the force of the fall broke his neck, and nothing could be done for him.

He had been in poor health for a number of years, but pluckily stuck to his work until a few weeks ago when he came home from Pensacola where he had been employed in Hughey’s Restaurant.

He was a model young man, and liked by all who knew him. The funeral will be held today.

 

Contributed by Michael Strickland

The Breeze – August 31, 1911 – Page 4

Mrs. Helen Jernigan Birch who has been very ill for some time at the home of her sister, Mrs. George Ward, passed away early Monday morning, and was buried Tuesday in the village cemetery.

Sunday it was thought that the crisis had passed and that she would recovered, but a sudden change for the worse was observed that night, and early Monday morning her spirit took its flight. Mrs. Birch was the daughter of Henry Jernigan, of Portland, and had attended school here for several terms before her marriage, and was loved by all who knew her.

[Contributed by Michael Strickland]

The Breeze – August 31, 1911 – Page 4

There is going to be the dickens of a smashup one of these days on some of our street corners on account of the neglect of auto drivers to sound their horns when approaching these places. You can look for it at Graves’, or May’s corner or at the boys’ dormitory.
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The city council at its next meeting ought to repeal the . . . ordinance . . . the one forbidding running bicycles . . . on the side walks, . . . and the one requiring auto drivers to sound their horns at street corners. . . . [N]o ordinance ought to be on the city law books that is not enforced.

[Contributed by Michael Strickland]

The Breeze – August 31, 1911 – Page 2

Whereas the Seaboard Air Line Railway and the Louisville and Nashville Railroad Company have hereto fore operated, and are now operating, a train leaving Jacksonville at 5 p. m., and arriving at Pensacola at 11:15 a. m., and known on the Seaboard Air Line Railway as train No. 79 and on the Louisville & Nashville Railroad as train No. 4, and a train leaving Pensacola at 5 p. m., and arriving at Jacksonville at 10:50 a. m., and known on the Louisville & Nashville Railroad and on the Seaboard Air Line as train No. 78, . . .

Whereas the schedule time of the said trains between Jacksonville and Pensacola is approximately eighteen hours, . . .

[Note: All of Florida was on the same time back then.]

[Contributed by Michael Strickland]

The Breeze – August 31, 1911 – Page 2

By The Auto Route
Judge Parish officiated at a (wedding) that had more than the usual spice of romance in it, even for Gretna Green Affairs.

Coy C. McKinnon, a son of Hon. D. L. McKinnon, of Marianna, was the groom, and Miss Willie Lee Kilpatrick, of the same place was the bride. On their arrival here on the evening train an auto was secured, and with Judge Parish as a passenger a ride was taken around the lake, and during the trip the words were spoken that made them man and wife. That road is not a part of the official honeymoon route to the Gulf, but De Funiak is on the way.

[Contributed by Michael Strickland]